A marxist approach to jane eyre

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A marxist approach to jane eyre

The main issues it addressed were social class and gender. Orphaned by two parents from opposing social classes and forced to live with an aunt who hates her, Jane has spent her life floating between the working class and the middle class wealthier families.

While Jane does not like her aunt, she looks down on the poor in the beginning, telling Abbot she would rather live with the cruel Reeds than live with the poor.

After the incident in the red room, Jane sees their cruelties as faults and declares her hatred of them. At this point in her life, Jane is siding with the servants, primarily, Bessie. When Jane goes to Lowood, she falls in love with the wealthier side of life once again, and her mentor becomes Miss Temple who basically teaches Jane to bow down to men and the higher social authority Mr.

When Miss Temple leaves and Bessie reenters her life, she sides again with the poor for a time. At Thornfield, her sympathies change again when she observes Blanche and her acquaintances.

Blanche scoffs at Jane, sending Jane again into the arms of the poor. The novel continues in this manner, with the ending showing Jane still stuck in the middle:A postcolonial approach to Jane Eyre might begin by considering the following questions: What does the novel reveal about the way cultural difference was represented in Victorian culture?

A marxist approach to jane eyre

How did Britain justify its colonialist project by imaging the East as "savage" or uncivilized? Feb 14,  · For this week's class, I read the first Marxist critical essay on Jane Eyre in the back of the book. The main issues it addressed were social class and gender. Orphaned by two parents from opposing social classes and forced to live with an aunt who hates her, Jane .

A Marxist Approach to Jane Eyre Based on the ideas of Karl Marx, this theoretical approach asks us to consider how a literary work reflects the socioeconomic conditions of the time in which it was written.

Marxism in Jane Eyre. By: Brooke Williams, Emma McLeod, and Hannah Smith.

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Marxist Criticism: Marxist criticism is a type of literary criticism centered around the influence of class, power, and economics on a piece of literature. A Marxist Approach to Jane Eyre Based on the ideas of Karl Marx, this theoretical approach asks us to consider how a literary work reflects the socioeconomic conditions of the time in which it was written.

A Marxist/Feminist Critique of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre essaysFrom the opening of Charlotte Bronte's novel, Jane Eyre, we can tell that Jane is not a "normal" Victorian girl.

From the first chapter of the story we are presented with .

A Marxist Approach to the Novel